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November 28Th Presentation


Garhan
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Outline on Quill Wings is as follows:

 

History

Sourcing

Feather Nomenclature and Anatomy

Preparation of Quills prior to tying

Matching

Preparation of Quills to tie in point

How to tie in matches sets

Wing Styles

How to tie down wings, up wings, curve types and styles

Marrying wings

What matches what doesn't

 

 

For those that would like to tie along. You can bring the following materials.

bring two or three different coloured matched duck quills (natural is fine as well) some will be needed for married quills at the end of the presentation.Bring 3399 or 3906B in a number 8 for the wet fly and 94840 in a 8 or 10 for the dry fly demos. Bring any coloured goose, swan or turkey as well and a larger salmon hook anything from a 5/0 down to a 1. Thread can be 12/0 to 3/0 your choice. A pair of scissors, or sharp and pointed edged knife, small ruler, small pointed caliber( like those found in a students math kit), bobbin and bodkin. Vise and lamps as usual.

Look forward to seeing all of you on Wednesday November 28th, 201

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Gary,

 

That was an excellent presentation. I managed to tie two sets of quill wings (wet and dry style) by following you. They turned out pretty good considering my duck quills were not matched. The "aha" moment was when you said to tie down on the first wrap. I had been making two loose wraps and then tightening down but the wings were always rotating even though I pulled straight down.

I am going to find some matched quills and try some more. Thanks,

 

Michael

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Yes Michael, in my limited experience with quill wings (most of it 30 yrs ago) it's the first wrap that is critical.

You have to squeeze the wings tightly to the hook shank and make sure they are right on top of it.

I was taught to make a wrap up between the fingers and quill on the near side, then down the other side between quill and fingers

with a slight loop on top of the fingers, then bring the thread up on the near side again between fingers and quill

and then pull straight up very snug to tighten the first wrap. This unsures the wings don't wrap around the hook shank.

You should be able to feel the thread cinch down onto the hook shank.

After that you always wrap the thread back away toward the quill butts from the tie in point.

 

This is the same technique used to prevent material spinning around the shank when attaching deer or elk hair onto the hook.

Wtih hair, you actially have to use the finger on the far side of the hook to apply a bit of pressure towards you to make sure it doesn't wrap.

 

Gary's method works equally as well for quills and you might find it a bit easier to execute

You just have to ensure you squeeze tight enough and pull the thread down at the right angle to keep the wings on top of the hook

 

What I really appreciated from Gary's presentation last night was the discussion on how to select material and match up the slips.

I've found most quills wings I've tied lately tend to split. I now reailize that's been either due to poor quality material or mismatched curves.

 

Thanks for the advice Gary!

Edited by dave robinson
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I wish I could've made it out. I look forward to being able to sign out the disk from the library.

 

Gary, I came across an alternate method for mounting the wings using figure-eight wraps to the side of the hook, with the quill slip already vertical. Are you familiar with this method? If so, what are your thoughts?

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I wish I could've made it out. I look forward to being able to sign out the disk from the library.

 

Gary, I came across an alternate method for mounting the wings using figure-eight wraps to the side of the hook, with the quill slip already vertical. Are you familiar with this method? If so, what are your thoughts?

 

I have seen what is called figure eight wraps. The Americans and British call it X wraps. But I have not seen it to the side of the hook shank, only on top.

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