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Fishing In The Great White North?


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As Freezing Persons Recollect the Snow--First Chill--Then Stupor--Then the Letting Go

"When your Jeep spins lazily off the mountain road and slams backward into a snowbank, you don't worry immediately about the cold".

 

Hmmm.. kinda sounds like a certain "fictitious" snow day we mighta had last year -- perhaps? As, I recall was it was an epic fail u-turn... stupor.. slide... then oh poo... ditch.... and 4-low to correct the situation.

"Driving out of town, defroster roaring,"

 

I am just happy my Jeep defroster is working again this winter. God bless "Jeep Heat"... it has saved many lives.

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Indeed Rick, mine too! Including tarps, fire, extra clothing in case of wet, -60c rated footwear, and most important - a small can of common sense which I hope isn't stale when I need it. :)

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I suppose we should do a session on survival gear this spring. It's been a couple of years since the last one. I carry a pretty complete kit in my hip pack when fishing. First aid kit, emergency fire starter and kindling, multitool, space blanket, twine , noisemaker etc. I even carry a darn good, but quite compact, water filter. You never know when a turned ankle might leave you stranded ovrenight. Hey Scratch, see no return after every sentence. Kinda makes all the thoughts run together like putting the em-PHA-sis on the wrong syl-A-ble.

Edited by dave robinson
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I suppose we should do a session on survival gear this spring. It's been a couple of years since the last one. I carry a pretty complete kit in my hip pack when fishing. First aid kit, emergency fire starter and kindling, multitool, space blanket, twine , noisemaker etc. I even carry a darn good, but quite compact, water filter. You never know when a turned ankle might leave you stranded ovrenight. Hey Scratch, see no return after every sentence. Kinda makes all the thoughts run together like putting the em-PHA-sis on the wrong syl-A-ble.

Actually Dave, the run-on sentence you refer to above is affectionately referred to as a "paragraph". They are used to group complete sentences into a logical block of similar subject or thought. Frankly - you were doing a bang up job until you missed the paragraph separator when you started complaining about run-on sentences.

 

:whootwhoo:

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I suppose we should do a session on survival gear this spring. It's been a couple of years since the last one. I carry a pretty complete kit in my hip pack when fishing. First aid kit, emergency fire starter and kindling, multitool, space blanket, twine , noisemaker etc. I even carry a darn good, but quite compact, water filter. You never know when a turned ankle might leave you stranded ovrenight. Hey Scratch, see no return after every sentence. Kinda makes all the thoughts run together like putting the em-PHA-sis on the wrong syl-A-ble.

Dave, that's a good list. As one who fishes alone quite often, especially in areas without cell coverage, I'm thinking of getting one of these. At first glance, they look expensive but when you consider what they provide, especially if you're out in the bush a lot, they are starting to look pretty cheap to me. Terry

 

SPOT website

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I've thought about a GPS, but I don't usually fish alone and I carry an FRS radio. The SPOT device would be useful when you are out of cell phone coverage, but seems kind of limited for general communication and position finding, I think I'd rather carry a full GPS.

By the way, the water filter I have as an MEC Hyperflow Microfilter. It packs up pretty small and filters everything except viruses which we don't find in the water around here. If you are in the habit of drinking water from the streams you fish, sooner or later you'll get giardia. This filter, plus a small water bottle is lighter than a hydration pack or multiple full bottles. If you are virus concerned, carry some iodine tablets. You can get the filter at Campers village or MEC.

http://www.mec.ca/Products/product_detail....D=1264728612756

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I've thought about a GPS, but I don't usually fish alone and I carry an FRS radio. The SPOT device would be useful when you are out of cell phone coverage, but seems kind of limited for general communication and position finding, I think I'd rather carry a full GPS.

Dave -

 

The spot unit isn't for telling you where you are - it's for telling your family or emergency response units. It allows you to 'check in' and provide a map location and an "I'm ok" message, or in an emergency - you hit 911 and the cavalry comes running. It's a bit of a double edged sword - as crews are working 10x harder in the US now because weekend warriors are taking off beyond their limits and using it as a taxi service.

 

I understand the bill for said service is outrageous (in the event of emergency response) but if it's life or death - what's money?

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Scratch:

I did understand that it was a panic device that sent your position to rescuers etc. If the problem is that you're lost and in need of help, it might be nice to know exactly where you are yourself so maybe you don't need to send for the expensive cavalry. The only benefit that I see is that it uses satellite communications to get the signal out. Hence you don't need to rely on cell phone coverage. Whatever happened to Iridium that was supposed to give affordable satellite cell service? The satellites are still up there sending flashes of light earthward. I do know you can buy a GPS with built in FRS radio that can send your position to similarly equipped devices (Garmin from $220 to $500). Might be an option if you and your buddies can agree on equipment.

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The satellites are still up there sending flashes of light earthward. I do know you can buy a GPS with built in FRS radio that can send your position to similarly equipped devices (Garmin from $220 to $500). Might be an option if you and your buddies can agree on equipment.

The whole point of the SPOT is this - if you've fallen and have a greenstick fracture of your femur, what good is knowing your coordinates going to do you when you're in spotty or zero cellular coverage?

 

Spot calls the cavalry, and saves you having a cell phone for your wife to call you on.

 

:)

 

The Garmin Rhino units - while well meaning - require 1) a buddy similarly equipped, 2) less than 1-2km range to said party.

 

Not hard to put that kind of distance on when you've taken off to fish every bend ahead of the poor bastards behind you. (wink).

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Scratch:

I understand the use of the SPOT. It just seems to me that if you want to have GPS to keep from getting lost and calling the cavalry for that alone (and Lord knows there's plenty of that going on. They lose a couple of "trampers" in New Zealand every year to hypothermia when they wander of the marked trail) then you'd have to carry SPOT & a regular GPS. So why doesn't somebody come up with a regular GPS that does what SPOT does in one convenient package?

Oh yeah, if you use GMRS on your portable radio, (designated FRS1 through 7 on GMRS equipped radios) you can get up to a 5 watt transmitter and 20 km range (they are more expensive that the typical 1 watt variety). The thing to remember about GMRS is that it's UHF, so transmission is line of sight. Not too useful in canyons or very hilly terrain, but good enough to call your fishing buddy around the bend.

How about this idea. You fish with a buddy and one caries a GPS, the other a cell phone and both of you a good GMRS radio. Or if your'e really flush one carries an iPhone (with the GPS and compas app ) plus a GMRS radio and the other just a GMRS radio. I know, too much cooridnation for guys that sometimes leave a rod or reel behind at home.

So when you fish with a buddy, you don't play leapfrog?

Edited by dave robinson
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I suggested the SPOT as the best option for someone who fishes alone in areas without cell service -- i.e. what I do a lot. I don't worry about getting lost, because where I fish, the river/creek is always the best route back to the vehicle. Therefore, my biggest concern when I'm alone, is a reliable way to let my wife know where I am, and that everything is ok, or NOT. I have the GPS, GMRS etc., but they aren't going to be much help if I break an ankle. Therefore, this spring, I'm buying a SPOT. Terry

 

PS Dave -- you're so right about GMRS. Mine are supposed to be good for 28 km, but I've done experiments, where they crapped out within 5km due to obstructions like mountains and stuff. I just use GMRS just to tell Vince that I've caught more fish than him -- nymphing of course :lol:.

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Boys

 

This was an interesting post though it did go sideways a bit but it really went sideways when my good pal Terry wrote the following words " I just use GMRS just to tell Vince that I've caught more fish than him -- nymphing of course" Terry, one up top worth two from below...thats my storey and I'm sticking to it.

 

Terry's use of the SPOT unit is right on the money and well worth the dough to buy and the monthly charge to keep it in use. Another question...would a handheld CB radio work better then an FRS.

 

Vince

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Another question...would a handheld CB radio work better then an FRS.

I think Lance and I can both comment on this one...

 

No.

 

UHF high power - yes. HAM handheld - yes. CB? Best suited to "cheese / bacon" not radio.

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Clear the deck, Engineer speak coming:

UHF means Ultra High Frequency. For General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) and Family Radio Service (FRS) 462 MHZ megahertz (thats 1 with six zeros cycles per second). Thats a higher frequency than your off air TV signal. At that frequency the wavelengths are very short (about 0.6 m) travel in straight lines only, do not bounce off the ionosphere and are easily absorbed by conductive objects (tree leaves, wet rock etc). Most GMRS hand held radio manufacturers make them in two power ratings, low (1 watt) and high (up to 5 watts). In Canada, the hand held radio to radio style are limited to 5 watts. commercial style GMRS base and repeater stations can go to 50 watts. No license is required for the hand held variety

CB radio is at a much lower frequency (around 27 MHZ) ( high frequency band) with a longer wavelength (11m). As a result transmissions are not absorbed as readily by objects and it kinda goes around the earth's curve a bit, so has a much longer range. A licence is not required for mobile CB radios. They are not useful for hand held devices because of the long antennae needed to support the long wavelength. (efficient antennae need to be no shorter than about 1/8 wave).

HAM (shorthand for amateur radio) operates at a range of wavelengths across the radio band. Most activity is what we used to call short wave radio which operates below below 30 MHZ (11m) because it propagates well, bounces off the ionosphere so can be used to transmit across the world.

Lastly, VHF is between the lower stuff and UHF . Most of those frequencies are used for TV, fire ambulance, aircraft and similar radio services.

Ta for now

Dave

Edited by dave robinson
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I don't think anyone is using CB anymore... Except for the odd trucker - rarely has mine even squawked without a jeeper nearby. Most real haulers and oil folks are using high frequency units (UHF) which are licenced for certain bands.

 

Dave has it straight, while the frequencies of CB do carry much further than the little FRS units - they are typically larger, and required more power and antenna to function effectively. More than is practical to carry in most cases.

 

Really - for sportsmen it's either FRS if you're with a buddy or UHF if you KNOW the frequencies that are being used on log / oil haul roads. Otherwise it's GPS / SPOT / Cellular / Sat-phone.

 

Simply - fish with a partner and FRS and don't exceed your radio range, carry spare keys, and if you fish alone - leave a plan with your family.

 

:)

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Doesn't anyone use a map and compass anymore?

 

As far as the SPOT goes, I got one last year. Me and the missus love it. It works great, and provides alot of peace of mind. I wouldn't go for the 'tracking' feature though. Also, I've heard that if you legitimately need assistance, the service is free. Those guys making the 'taxi' calls are on the hook for about 10K.

 

Rick

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