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Muir Anyone?


Dragon Troller
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Weeds - 176

Fish - 1 abt 10" if you stretched him a little :P

 

Was a gorgeous evening - but I think Norm caught all the fish :D

 

And was good getting the additional practice setting up the pontoon boat.

 

Trying to get the set up down to 15-20 minutes, but not quite there yet ;)

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It was a good evening even if the fishing was slow. I managed 3 for the night biggest about 17-18"

 

Didn't recongnise Norm and Bill untill they were leaving!

 

I'm working on my speed rowing :-) for my Dragon Troll !

 

It seemed effective enough!

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Trying to get the set up down to 15-20 minutes, but not quite there yet ;)

 

I've had my pt boat for a few years now, and in my opinion, if you want to reach that set up time, you'll have to keep your frame together and stuff in your vehicle. Then when you arrive at a lake, pull out frame, inflate pontoons, strap to frame and bob's your uncle.

 

Doing it this way, I takes me about 15 minutes.

 

Hope that helps.

 

Tight lines

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I have the same issue with my Zodiak.

From bag to water is at least 20 minutes. Same on takedown.

A high capacity electric air pump sure helps.

but it's getting those dang floorboards in that takes the time.

That and adding all the acessories

(trolling motor, battery, depth sounder, fore and aft anchors, throw rope)

Then you gotta rig your rod etc.

Now if I had a place to store a small boat trailer, I'd keep it all set up

and just buy a good tarp to cover everything.

Anybody got spare garage space?

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Dave

 

I've seen you and your Zod in action and I can tell from watching you last year that you've lost your sense of time....I think you should add an hour to your posted time of 20 minutes and then you'd be in the ball park.

 

and

 

just who is Bob's uncle

 

Vince

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lol!

 

...or who is Bob?

 

Dave

 

I've seen you and your Zod in action and I can tell from watching you last year that you've lost your sense of time....I think you should add an hour to your posted time of 20 minutes and then you'd be in the ball park.

 

and

 

just who is Bob's uncle

 

Vince

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Vince:

Don't forget that the last time you saw me putting Zoie together was only about the 2nd attempt.

This spring, I had ample opportunity to practice assembly and disassembly while rigging up the launching wheels and modifying my front anchor arrangement. I'm pretty confident I can now get the boat together in 20 minutes. Of course adding the motor, battery etc will add another few minutes. I'm going to be doing a real world trial tonight as I'm taking a couple of guys from my church group out to Muir.

 

Neither Ranger Bob nor "The Bobber" himself are my uncle.

 

Although once assembled, you could Bob" along in your PT boat

or if a poor job of assembly, you could find yourself doing a "Bobber".

 

According to Wikipedia: "Bob's your uncle" means "and there you have" it or "its OK." Also,

"In 1887, British Prime Minister Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess of Salisbury, appointed his nephew Arthur James Balfour as Minister for Ireland. The press had a field day when he referred to the Prime Minister as “Uncle Bob”.[1] Balfour later went on to become Prime Minister himself. This theory claims that to have "Bob" as one's uncle is a guarantee of success, hence the implied meaning, "and if you do this, you cannot fail." Another theory is that the phrase derives from the slang "all is bob", which means "everything is good"."

 

The English seem to have a few sayings related to "Bob".

"Bobbies" (British policemen) referred to Robert Peel's first professional police force in London 1829.

 

As an entemologial aside, We now call them "Cops" which arose from one of the following:

a. referred to the copper badge worn by early policemen

b. Around the year 1700, the slang verb cop entered English usage, meaning "to get ahold of, catch, capture." By 1844, cop showed up in print, and soon thereafter the -er suffix was added, and a policeman became a copper, one who cops or catches and arrests criminals. Copper first appeared in print in 1846, the use of cop as a short form of copper occured in 1859.

 

Back to Bob:

In old English money a shilling (12 pence) was known as a Bob. There were 20 Bob (240 pence) in a Pound. and a Crown was 5 Bob. The dollar to pound conversion today is roughly two to one. So a Bob today would be worth about 10 cents Canadian.

That would make your uncle Bob worth about a dime.

If you want to carry that any further, ask the "dime lady".

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Man nice to see all our tax dollars going into paying our gov't works for looking up what Bob your uncle means. :laugh:

Just leave the Zody blowen up slide into back of truck back up to boat ramp slam on breaks Zody lands 1/2 way into water throw gear into, push the rest of the way in and off fishing 10min tops. :laugh: Oh forgot before you do this need couple of good stiff shots of Scotch & 5alive. :cheers: Life is good.

 

Vince most likely see you tomorrow but a little later in day.

 

Tight Lines Always

Dennis S :fishing::fish_jump:

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Pull up, drop landing gear, walk to water, add rod, park car, go fish.

 

10 minutes with utility trailer for the toon. ;)

Aye, fix holes later... and make sure your straps stay on along the way. :whootwhoo:

 

post-65-1215220626_thumb.jpg

 

PS - I ain't none of yer Uncle's.

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My companions got delayed so the trip to Mir was postponed to sometime Saturday.

I'll get them to put a stopwatch on the Zoie assembly for you Vince.

 

And no, gov't time was not used to find the Bob stuff.

I spent almost all day in interminable meetings.

I did it on lunch hour, saved and posted it when I quit a bit early today after going in very early two days running.

(still suffering from a bit of Italian Jet Lag)

 

Hey, don't complain too much about my digging into the etiology (history or origin) of words.

English is a fascinating language. It changes with time and borrows greatly from history of itself and other languages.

Knowing the source of words and phrases as well as their meanings only enhances communication.

 

One of the joys of English is one's ability to draw on its vast resource of vocabulary, idioms, history and structure

to communicate in a variety of ways from the vulgar to the eloquent.

I also find some of the background of commonly used language to be highly amusing.

I try to share that when I come across it.

 

There must be hundreds of sayings, words and turns of phrase in the language that refer to fishing.

Keep your eyes out for those and dig a bit and you might find something really interesting.

Look up "angling" and fishing "with an angle" as Walton wrote. (haven't yet).

It might be fun to see where that came from.

Edited by dave robinson
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