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  1. https://youtu.be/97OkApMx8eM
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  2. I ran across this video by Steve Cooke on catch and release science that I thought would be of interest to everyone here.
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  3. Folks, Here is further information on the Prairie Creek Water Diversion. My concern, this is first time a mid/smaller stream was diverted for Fracing. Prairie Creek is no longer a virgin. Do other foothills streams also get deflowered? The shale gas formations are overlayed by foothills streams. http://bamboorods.ca/Prairie%20Creek%20Water%20Diversion%20-%20web.html Please take the time to read it and write a letter or two. Make sure you copy your MLA. regards, Don
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  4. It’s not hard to understand why protection of riparian land is a priority for those who spend much of their recreational time walking through it. Fishing is often more about being in those places where trout live than the act of catching them. Perhaps, as Roderick Haig-Brown wrote, fishing is just an excuse to be near rivers! Like many TUC Chapters, Northern Lights Fly Fishers has been actively involved in riparian protection throughout its history. Over the last five years, however, the Chapter has increased its efforts and helped protect 160 acres of riparian land and another 14 acres of upland habitat, which in turn provide benefits to the stream, its water, fish, invertebrates, and biodiversity. All of this work has been in central Alberta’s cattle country along the Raven River and Dogpound Creek, both known for the quality of the brown trout angling they provide. Both streams are popular destinations for Chapter members so there was some self-interest in undertaking these projects! What made the work possible, however, was the funding provided by the Alberta Conservation Association (ACA) through its Conservation, Community and Education grant program. Erecting fencing, especially wildlife friendly fencing, to keep cattle out of the stream, and providing alternative watering systems, are expensive undertakings. Our 2021 project faced some special challenges. What was particularly remarkable was the cooperative effort that made it successful. Northern Lights had an ACA grant approved to protect 12 acres of riparian land on a ranch near the headwaters of Dogpound Creek, but the landowners decided not to go ahead with the work. Meanwhile, the owners of Leask Ranches, Bill and Carolyn, near Cremona, Alberta, contacted ACA for help regarding the damage their cattle were doing to Dogpound Creek – eroding banks, depleting vegetation, and muddying the water of what was otherwise a pristine stretch of a popular brown trout fishery. Steep banks along the Creek made provision of a different watering system a somewhat complex engineering challenge. A cooperative effort began: ACA’s Riparian Coordinator quickly worked out a protection plan, gathered material and labour cost estimates, and arranged a 10 year agreement with the Leasks for them to maintain exclusion fencing; Bill Leask offered to build the new fencing required himself; Northern Lights and ACA worked out an agreement to transfer the previously-approved grant funding for fence materials and a watering system to the Leask project; Mountain View County provided some cash towards fencing through its Alternative Land Use Program (ALUS), and the Alberta Riparian Habitat Management Society, aka ‘Cows and Fish’, also stepped in to help. Cows and Fish has been involved with landowners, improvements in grazing and management of riparian areas for about 20 years. It not only contributed towards the costs of a culvert well, pump, troughs, and solar panels to get water up the bank to the pasture land, but also provided a detailed assessment of riparian health to identify other means for improvement and a benchmark for long term monitoring. We may need volunteers to help plant willow stakes next spring! Collaboration accomplished a lot. The creek, its fish, fauna, flora and visitors, the cattle and the ranchers will all benefit. Northern Lights is now looking for more riparian protection projects for 2022. There’s an added bonus to the pleasure of being able to walk a stream bank and cast a fly in knowing that you’ve made some small contribution to the health of that environment.
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  5. Stauffer 2021.docStauffer Redds 2021.docxx Even though we put up a plaque in the Muir Lake Alberta Angler Walk of Fame honouring Don Andersen for his many contributions over the years to recreational angling in Alberta, he won't quit doing more! Equipped with a new knee he has walked the creek again this year counting spawning redds to compare with similar counts he's conducted for many years. See his report above. And, by the way, Don has donated a new 7'6" 4/5 Wt bamboo fly rod for us to raffle in support of our conservation projects. For more info check out https://www.nlft.org/2021/10/30/cane-rod-raffle-6/
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  6. WHAT TROUT EAT – DIGITAL EDITION After the successful installation of the new ‘What Trout Eat’ displays at Muir Lake, some members of Northern Lights Fly Fishers have used that material in developing a new stillwater fishing resource that’s now freely available to any individual or organization interested in using it for educational purposes. It’s a series of 44 illustrated, easy to read slides on the 12 primary natural food items that trout find to eat in lakes when they arrive from the fish hatcheries. It also includes fly and spin fishing strategies to imitate those food items at the different stages of their life cycle - larva, pupa, emerger, adult etc. Although It’s written for an Alberta audience, especially youth and beginning anglers, much of its content is relevant to other regions of Canada and other audiences. Its authors are willing to help any TUC Chapter or other organization adapt the resource to meet local needs where needed. The text has hyperlinks to over 130 additional sources of online information - videos and articles on interesting facts about and behaviours of each particular trout food item, its entomology, and related angling strategies. Each section also includes a tip provided to us by KEEP FISH WET on best practices for releasing fish. The primary intent of ‘What Trout Eat -Digital Edition’ is to introduce youth to stillwater fishing and help make lake fishing more interesting, productive, and enjoyable. Check it out at What Trout Eat - Digital Edition and please pass on the link to others who might be interested. Northern Lights will periodically update links and information within the resource and would greatly appreciate suggestions to nlft.tu@gmail.com for additions and improvements.
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  7. Here are the links from the map session tonight. https://www.gaiagps.com/ geodiscover portal arcgis roads public lands (grazing leases) sportfishing regulations bonus
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  8. Earlier this year some members of Northern Lights were asked to provide feedback on early versions of an App that would provide quick access to the regulations for every lake and river in the province. The web-based application Alberta’s Sportfishing Regulations Application is now available to view the regulations and other information from your mobile devices or desktop computer. The application is map-based; you can search for a waterbody, search an area, or use your location. It is designed to provide easy access to the sportfishing regulations and to information related to fisheries management in Alberta. It doesn't need to be downloaded to your phone and can be accessed while you are in cell service. For each waterbody, you will find information including: the fishing seasons and bait rules Sportfishing regulations for each species, including possession and size limits If the waterbody has regulations for more than one area or section, read the descriptions for each and click on the area or section to see the regulations. You can: Search for a waterbody by clicking on the binoculars. Type its name or use the area search tool. Zoom in and out using your mouse or the zoom buttons, and clicking on a waterbody. Zoom to your current location by clicking on the arrowhead symbol and then touch a waterbody for regulations. Find popular links, Report-A-Poacher and National Parks fishing information by clicking on the information icon For Help and Contact Information, click on the question mark icon in the top right hand corner. View updates, corrections to sportfishing regulations or sportfishery closures: Advisories, Corrections and Closures
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  9. One of the four projects for which NLFF received an ACA Conservation, Community, and Education Grant this year was to continue our work with ACA in protecting riparian land along Dogpound Creek. However, the owner of the property where we had planned to install wildlife-friendly fencing and an alternative watering system to keep his cattle out of the stream and the 12 acres of riparian land on his property, decided not to go ahead. We let the ACA Grants Coordinator know and planned to return the grant funds that we’d already received. This week, however, ACA told us about another family, further upstream on the Dogpound, who also had 12 acres of riparian land on their property that they were interested in protecting. It’s just to the east of Highway 22 near Cremona. These folk already had some fencing in place although needed about another 300m. The cattle watering system needed was more complex and involved digging a well and laying a water line to three troughs at different locations across the grazing area. We decided to take it on - not doing the digging but asking the ACA Grants Coordinator if we could keep the grant and contract the hard work to a professional. That required approval from the ACA President/CEO which we received. There was no need to build access gates into the fencing for this project as we’ve had to do in previous projects. The Creek is accessible from the road and the landowner already had a couple of gates in the fencing they had previously erected. They’re used to seeing anglers passing through. Heard though that there had been some fish kill on the Creek during the heat wave a couple of weeks ago. Net result is that we’re continuing with our 6th continuous year of riparian protection on the Dogpound and the Raven supported by funding from ACA. Hope to post some photos soon.
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  10. Hello Jim its JP you can count me in see you there
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