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SnoWolf

Survival/first Aid Gear

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We have had a few of our friends exspierance some splashes and crashes this summer. I am wondering how many carry any survival/ first aid gear when they are out in the wild..?

 

What items do you think would make up the ultimate SFA kit..? Keeping in mind it be geared towards one person use that can be easily carried all day..!

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You can actually buy a very basic kit packaged in a sardine can at most campng stores.

To that you need to add a basic first aid kit, a space blanket, a couple of power bars, .

a container for drinking water, a basic water filter and some purification tablets.

I'm presuming that you already carry a multi-tool, small flashlight and some fishing line in your vest.

That will do for an ovenight emergency.

It might not be bad to have one of those FRS radios along too.

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This is probably very un-fly fishing like, but a small spinner is also good to throw in. Water proof matches ans some fine steel wool for fire starter is handy too.

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Dave M;

Glad to see you're still alive and kicking.

Another good fire starter is a couple of cotton balls coated with Vaseline stored in a film canister (if you can find one)

The sardine tin kit I mentioned has waterproof matches.

I noticed that London Drugs now carries small pelican cases, as does Mountain Equipment Coop,

One f those would make a great container for a basic survival kit.

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Asprins or Tylenol would help for sure.

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A basic first aid kit would include those along with a selection of bandages, gauze and adhesive tape,

plus moleskin, alcohol wipes, some polysporin, tweezers, needle etc.

MEC and Campers village carry a range of pocket sized kits.

You should also have a small mirror or reflective surface for signalling, some strong twine or cord and a short piece of duct tape

(wrapped around the mirror or some such object to keep it usable)

 

What I haven't mentioned is the stuff you would be wearing or carrying in your vest anyway.

Rain jacket,hat, sunglasses, bug spray, handkerchief, kleenex or TP, and a pocket knife (small swiss army style is best)

Of courses a key item you should not be without is a water bottle

if you're going minimalist, the safety and first aid kit and other loose gear can be carried easily in a hip pack.

and I'll put another plug in for a wading staff.

Not only does it help keep you from a dunking, but if you should sprain an ankle or worse, it may be what gets you out of the woods.

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And given the recent weather, while we're at it.

How many of us carry a winter survival kit on our car?

The first aid and survival kit you use for fishing would double for this in winter with a couple of additions.

Steel mug or tin (for melting snow) matches and candle (also can keep you warm in the car with no engine running)

Spare boots, socks, toque and mitts.

Fleece blanket or small sleeping bag.

Collapsible shovel, flashlight

 

Having these available make make even running off the road or failure to start less a harrowing experience while you wait for the tow truck, even in the city.

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And given the recent weather, while we're at it.

How many of us carry a winter survival kit on our car?

The first aid and survival kit you use for fishing would double for this in winter with a couple of additions.

Steel mug or tin (for melting snow) matches and candle (also can keep you warm in the car with no engine running)

Spare boots, socks, toque and mitts.

Fleece blanket or small sleeping bag.

Collapsible shovel, flashlight

 

Having these available make even running off the road or failure to start less a harrowing experience while you wait for the tow truck, even in the city.

 

Dont forget about the Arctic Onion. Peeing in a condom instead of going outside and loosing all your heat in the car. But I never liked onions anyway because of that and would make few exceptions. They always remind me of a desperate situation in the Arctic years ago. Girls don't know what you would have to do, but I would let you figure it out. We also kept in the vehicle a empty Tobacco can with a roll of toilet paper in it and some Broson lighter fluid to build a mini heater. Light the heater outside of corse, then put the lid back on after you bunched a bunch of holes in it to draw air and throw heat.

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Dave M;

Glad to see you're still alive and kicking.

Another good fire starter is a couple of cotton balls coated with Vaseline stored in a film canister (if you can find one)

The sardine tin kit I mentioned has waterproof matches.

I noticed that London Drugs now carries small pelican cases, as does Mountain Equipment Coop,

One f those would make a great container for a basic survival kit.

 

Steel wool is great because it works when wet

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Thanks Dave.

 

Been a little out of circulation for a while but all is good.

 

Dave

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Cotton balls and Vaseline....? Never heard of that one before.

 

Don't saturate the cotton balls with Vaseline. The dry portion catches a spark very well, especially if you tear it in half, but the coated portion is virtually impossible to light without an open flame. Once the spark catches, the cotton wicks up the Vaseline. Burns hot and steady for a surprisingly long time. Fantastic kindling starter.

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I think a dam good knife and rope and a water bottle are a must along with water proof matches. With these you can do almost anything if need be.

It's good to have a survival kit of some kind, but again we can go over board with this just like ones fly boxes.

Where weights not a problem then have at it.

 

I will admit I am very bad with a survival kit and am going to try to rectify that this fishing season coming up.

 

Tight Lines Always

Dennis S :fishing::fish_jump:

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And we worry about how many fly box we carry to add weight to our daily trek.

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Hahaha Garhan.

You are right. It looks like everyone knows what we should carry but I do not see much mention of what is being carried and if much thought is being given to it. The Spot is a product I have some interest in but it's use would be restricted to emergencies only. I am thinking most,myself included do not carry much of anything beyond the basic fishing needs. This is fine when fishing with a friend however I think it needs to be taken a little more seriously when fishing alone. Weight and bulk are the two main concerns when putting such a kit together.

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I usually fish alone, and I always have a small survival kit, first aid kit, and a SPOT. Maybe that's why I've stuck to only 2 flyboxes all this time. But when I do take someone out, I feel like those supplies are even more important. I've got training and ability, I've gotten myself into and out of some pretty hairy situations, and it's very likely that no matter what happens I can improvise, adapt and overcome. But if someone's with me, I feel a little responsible for them, so I take even less chances.

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I dnt run a SPOT but my buddy does when we go into back country. I do have a US Marine First Aid Kit and Survial Kit that attaches to my belt. But seldom take it with me on most outings. But it is in the truck. Really the only time I take it is on long hikes on creeks and rivers that are secluded.

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Next year part of my safety kit will include a handheld outdoor GPS. I like fishing new water and like gettting off the beaten path. I doubt I would ever have to use it to find my way back but if one got injuried, had an incident with a predator or something stupid happened with the weather and you could not back track your route on a river it could be a life saver.

 

The one I recently purchased was the Magellan 610 explorist. Has some neat features and with what you can do with plotting way points, routes, etc I'm looking forward to trying it out.

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The GPS will let you know your position, but if incapacitated,how do you relate that to potential rescuers.

Much of Alberta's back country doesn't have cell coverage.

That's where the SPOT works. it actually sends your SOS and position via the satellite

Looks like the basic service is about $100/yr

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Survival kit includes a large tin cup, carbon steel pocket knife, compass, space blanket, snare wire, signal mirror, whistle, bullion cubes, water purification tablets, flint and steel, cotton balls and Vaseline, safety pins, barbed fish hooks and about 12 feet of parachute cord.

 

First Aid supplies are band aids and soap, a triangular bandage, gauze and tape, cayenne pepper and zap-a-gap, aspirin, and an epi-pen.

 

SnoWolf, the SPOT isn't just for emergencies. If you practice the whole, "let someone know where you're going and when you'll be back," thing, the SPOT allows you to change your location at any time, hit the OK button and you're still playing by the rules.

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Thx Junior

Very basic SFA kit. Small and easy to carry.

 

What would be the purpose of the cayenne pepper..?

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